Holidays that are full of complexity are neither fun nor comfortable

21/06/2020

Holidays that are full of complexity are neither fun nor comfortable.

This American study is the first to address this issue and concluded that vacations are good for physical health as well as mental health. Genes during the holiday season are activated and reduce stress, while also improving our immune system.

The researchers, led by genetic teacher Eric Sand of the Icahn School of Medicine in Mount Sinai, New York, who published the study in the journal Translational Psychiatry, took samples from 94 women, healthy and aged 30 to 60, who escaped for a week to California. There they meditated and practiced yoga or just relaxed in their accommodation.

The researchers took blood samples before and after the holidays and analyzed the differences and activity of the approximately 20,000 genes they collected, using genetic analysis.

Although previous studies have confirmed the positive effect of vacations on human psychology (although depression after the end is difficult to avoid ...), new research shows that vacations change gene function for the better. This positive effect of the holidays can last for a month or even longer, even up to ten months, if one also meditated or practiced yoga (or both) during the holidays.

The study found that a week of relaxation was enough to trigger changes in DNA that reduced stress, boosted the immune system and reduced the level of toxic proteins associated with depression and ignorance.

"It's impressive to see the big changes in gene expression thanks to the holidays, when you get away from the hectic pace of life, living in a relaxed environment and even for such a short time. Our findings show a significant positive effect of the holidays and a suppression of stress reactions, "said lead researcher Elisa Eppel, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California-San Francisco, according to Britain's Telegraph.

Latest posts in our blog

Read what's new this week
 

About two hundred and fifty thousand people in Greece suffer from psoriasis and face a number of problems. A predominant problem is the fact that most are unaware that psoriasis is not contagious resulting in significant psychosocial burden on sufferers.